Art, process and design blog of an aspiring industrial designer.

Posts tagged ‘Installation art’

Vernier Panton

Vernier Panton is such an amazing artist and so influential to me!  He really embraced and pushed the futurist, space-age style of the 60’s and created environments, not just restaurants, bars or hotels, with his designs.

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IMAGES:  1 // // 3 // 4 // 5 // 6 // 7 // 8  // 9
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Button-Down Shirts Put to So Much Better Use

Great installations by artist Kaarina Kaiakkonen.

This is one of my absolute favorite types of art – everyday materials reapplied just for the sake of being reconsidered (as color? as fabric?), rather than to even be environmentally conscious or to have a recycled-aesthetic.  (Not that those aren’t good reasons for reapplying everyday materials, but I just love when its just for the sake of the piece only)

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IMAGES: (top to bottom) here // here // here // here

“Using hundreds of second-hand shirts Finnish environmental artist Kaarina Kaiakkonencreates site-specific installations suspended above roadways or inside large warehouse spaces. Her most recent work Are We Still Going On? (top images), was conceived at Collezione Maramotti, a private collection of contemporary art in Reggio Emilia, Italy, and involves hundreds of children’s shirts hung in rows to resemble the interior hull of a giant ship. The shirts are organized by color on each side of the skeletal boat to represent a sort of symbolic dialogue about gender. You can learn more over on Art Texts Pics and see a brief video of the piece here. (via global art news)” (via Colossal and Hattip to Chris at his amazing blog!)

Art Installation: Aggravure by Baptiste Debombourg. Or Staplemania.


Baptiste Debombourg designed and created this amazing installation of  Italian Mannerists that is made up of over 450 000 staples.  This is one of my favorite installations that I have seen for quite a while.  To me, it is neither ‘minimal’ or maximal (which I love), and uses materials in such an effective and resourceful way.  When people re-use materials, although, yes the concept of recycling is pretty, I like it even more when the artist uses their material not for this reason, but for a more deliberate reason, based on their art.   Perhaps they chose the recycled material because that material was very accessible to them – maybe there existed a surplus of staples in this person’s life – or because they wanted to re-think an everyday material, or because they were sitting there, staring at the art in a staple, waiting for that art to explode outwards.  Here, I think the staple definitely adds to the effectiveness of the piece.

I love how work-intensive, and detailed or repetitive it looks and how intricate and romantic the overall piece is.  You could probably say that the material is at odds with the subject matter, but I don’t know if I think so.  I think they work together in a hidden way.  Like the short lines/strokes of the staples create hairs or cells in the shadows of the figures. Its like it is so reserved but has so much heart (kinda like what people say about the British…)


I also just love the contrasting scales of the staples and the large image.  So fascinating, and it makes the piece compelling at different distances.  I feel like, because of this, this piece would be amazing to see in-person.

Check his work out here: Aggravure by Baptiste Debombourg, Colossal, Neatorama Spotlight.

If you like this piece, check out Marcus Levine’s nail art installations! Its really, really cool, too. Here and here.

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