Art, process and design blog of an aspiring industrial designer.

Posts tagged ‘business’

Trust

“I have an incredible trust that things will work out. If I lose that, they won’t. I think that trust is one of the biggest, most important things you need when living a creative, courageous life, because at the end of the day, you have to believe that things will work out in some way. It might not be the way that you planned, but something else will come in its place.”

-Tina Roth Eisenberg found here (ps! tons of great creative-business quotes in the article – quick, thoughtful read!)

Hey guys! Sorry I’ve been incommunicado for so long! School has been so busy and inspiring and exciting, and I just couldn’t pull myself away. Anyway, here’s a great treat of a quote by Tina The Great (Tina the Magnificent is Tina Fey, so…). I hope you are all having a happy Christmas, where ever you are, whatever your diet, beliefs, jobs or hairstyles. :)

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Wonderland

This video, Wonderland, is real-er portrayal of life working in the creative industry (film, advertising, graphic design, computer animation, etc.).  Super fascinating, and not always uplifting, but I watched it, and then watched it again – if that’s saying anything.

viaSwissMiss

Being Indispensable

beingindespensable,july13-2013IMAGES: Seth // Linch

I am reading Seth Godin‘s book Linchpin, that I originally heard about through a NY Creative Interns recommendation.  Right now I’m really into learning and reading as much about entering the business world as possible (… as much as I find not-boring), and Seth Godin falls right in there.  If you’ve never heard of Seth Godin, he’s an author and speaker who focuses on marketing, with a penchant for supporting the creative industry.  He also runs one of the most popular marketing blogs in the world. (Check it out.  Its, um, pretty good.)  Anyway, the book talks a lot about, not necessarily needing to change your job, but being indispensable in the workplace.

It got me thinking about stuff.

To me, the guts of the book emphasize: whenever you are working anywhere, it essential to input your identity and creativity into your work, because that is what makes you indispensable.  Its essential to do this, not just because it feels good, or creates a better experience for you, or makes you happier with your job, but because it is better for the company and makes you necessary.

Making yourself ‘indispensable’ means that if you left, they could not replace you as you.  I’m not saying they couldn’t get another nurse, junior graphic designer, store salesman.  I’m saying that they could not have another person that could add to their company in the same way you could – with your unique perspective and background and identity and creativity. (Because I don’t care who you are, EVERYONE can be creative.  And if you think you aren’t, then you are just either boxing in what you think ‘creative’ means, or being lazy.)  Your ‘replacement’ could even be someone very good, but they could not replace you in the company.  And that makes you ESSENTIAL to the company’s identity.

If you are a waiter, and you realize that its better to have all the wait-staff learn how to use the dishwasher incase the dishwashing worker goes to the bathroom and slows down the line, that’s creativity.  If you work at a mill and realize that it’d be faster to work in relay than to carry materials back and forth, that is inputing your identity and creativity into your work.

What are some of your qualitites that make you indispensible?  I think one of my best qualities is that I crave pushing the envelope, even when its easy to think realistically.  (I try to never be ‘realistic’, coming from a too-much-feasibility, engineering background.) Tell me about some of your awesome traits and creativity in the workplace. :)

Anthropologie Display and Store Design Part I

One of my dream jobs (that I will land in the near future..) is doing display design for Anthropologie. I think that store (umm, I should say religion…) is miles ahead in that regard. They’ve had the most inventive, brand-relevant display designs for years.  It strengthens the styling of their products within the store tenfold, in my opinion. You feel cool and individual and arty and interesting and cute just entering that place.  Its like I half expect Michelle Williams or somebody to walk past me on my way out.

I’ve featured Anthropologie’s display design on the blog before, but I have researched so many of their displays (and they are so fabulous) that I feel that they warrant individual posts. For the same reason why I love The Office or Flash Mobs, the display designers at Anthropologie make the everyday, ubiquitous, boring and annoying items fascinating and romantic. The really quiet, unassuming items.  Paper and cups and cardboard and 2×4’s and forks and cupcake liners.  I also love that they don’t ‘repurpose’ these materials because they’re making a statement about the environment. Nope, they do it because they’re available or cheap or just the shape they wanted.  To me, its like the designers are inspired by the crappy garbage items they choose to use.  I freaking love that.  That is catnip for me.

Here are some winter-related (even though its June) pictures for you:

anthropologie1a,june7-2013anthropologie1b,june7-2013anthropologie1c,june7-2013

IMAGES: green circles, winter wonderlandmarshmallows, winter paper hangings.
ornament window, milk carton igloo, snowball bike.
window full of fluff.

Great anthropologie display design image sources: www.warymeyers.com , plentyofcolor.com , anthropologie+you flickr, pinterest.com.

Advice to Young Future Designers

In case you haven’t heard of the website, The Great Discontent, they do these really interesting, long interviews of awesome famous artists, designers, etc.  They also always have a great photo of their subject.  A couple weeks ago they spoke to Olimpia Zagnoli, a great Italian illustrator.

When asked about advice for kids starting out she said:
“Be different. Keep your eyes open. Record everything you see, process it, and then spit it back out in your own very personal way. Get inspired by something that’s not just illustration. Be serious. Be silly. Get drunk sometimes. Dream a lot. Don’t think you can’t do it, because you can.”
– Olimpia Zagnoli viaTheGreatDiscontent

apr20,2013-OlimpiaZagnoli

Their most recent interview with Matthew Smith was great in its entirety, but here is my favorite quote about his advice to young future designers:
“I would say three things. One, spend time learning the visual language rather than just learning to style.

Second, learn to be a businessperson. Designers need to know how to solve business-oriented problems and ask questions that get at the heart of things. If you don’t already listen to The Businessology Show with Dan Mall and Jason Blumer, that might be a good place to start. Jason was my CPA for a long time and is one of the smartest, most interesting people I’ve ever met and Dan is a business owner who is doing amazing things. As designers, we need to be well-versed in marketplace and business issues, otherwise we remain stylists.

Third, for those designers who have a similar story to mine, limit your exposure to approval. Find the people you trust the most and stick with them. Ask them to help you build your own set of judgements to know when you’re doing great work because the guys who tell you that you’re one pixel off are not doing you any favors.”
– Matthew Smith viaTheGreatDiscontent

apr20,2013-OlimpiaZagnoli1

IMAGES: Olimpia Zagnoli illustrations here // here // here

Great Entrepreneurs

“If you look at the careers of great entrepreneurs and you look at the moment they took their plunge, the plunge is rarely a great financial or material risk, it’s a social risk. At the moment they started their new businesses, everyone around them said ‘you’re an idiot’.”
— Malcolm Gladwell (via swissmiss)

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