Art, process and design blog of an aspiring industrial designer.

Archive for August, 2012

Music: Oogum Boogum :)

Hey all! Even though I really need to be studying right now, here’s a song that is reminding me that there will be life after exam! And that summer’s not over yet!

Art: Elizabeth Peyton, David Hockney and Pencil Crayon!


Elizabeth Peyton and David Hockney are artists who both use pencil crayon really, really well.  And that’s super interesting to me, because its not something you see a lot in fancy art and its extremely affordable and accessible.

Elizabeth Peyton: here // here // here


David Hockney: here // here // here

Notice how Hockney uses the pencil crayon more in a general-shading way, whereas Peyton uses the lines of the pencil crayon really effectively to show planes and volume and direction.  Both of them mix and layer colors so well, which add such a sense of detail and depth to the pieces.  I find with the colors and the texture of the pencil crayon, each of the pieces have a hardness and a sense of defined shape, but also a softness in their layering, the shades used and the way the drawings often fade into the background.

Anyway, enjoy! Back to studying..

Students: Variety for Portfolio

( Hey dudes, just a warning: this week might be a bit shoddy with blog posts, since I have a killer exam next week and then some family stuff coming, but I will try to keep up as much as possible! )

Sup fellow students! So, we are going to talk about portfolios again today.
Although you should take my advice with a grain of salt, one thing that I think is really important to have in a portfolio, is a demonstration of a lot of different media.  When applying to art or design school I think that it is so important to show how your voice translates, your versatility, where your interests span to, that you are open to trying new things, that you are willing to go against your natural skills, etc., etc.  Also, I mean if it were me reading through hundreds of portfolios, it’d be nice to see a cool new media used every so often.  It wakes you up I think, and makes you re-think a product or material you may have forgotten about.

Anyway, here are some examples of types of media you should dabble in:
1) DRAW
2) PAINT

3) COLLAGE
4) COMPUTER – graphic arts, solid modeling, whatever!
5) SCULPTURE
6) MIX 3-D & 2-D and TEXTILE ART
7) WRITING

8) FILM

9) ETCC!!!

10) combo of all/some media ………….

drawing – Leonardo da Vinci here // paint – Happy Menocal here // collage – The Selby here  (ps: I know this isn’t really collage work, but it makes me think of collage, cause its a really well-chosen and well cut-out photo) // computer – Solid Modelling of USB Port here // sculpture – Rodin here // mix 3-d & 2-D  – Maranon here // writing – The Mavenist here // film – The Pleasure Of here

Link Round Up!


1. Vintage Vogue Magazine Covers From The Early 20th Century. here.
2. Deb from smitten kitchen posted this recipe for her favorite brownies, and trust, when she posts it, it is gonna be good. Everything I’ve ever made from her site has turned out awesome! Plus, she’s one of the most famous and oldest food bloggers around! here
3. A creative review of the 2012 London Olympics. (for me, really interesting.. ) here
4. According to Vanity Fair these are the most fashionable films of all time.  WaxWane did an interesting post about a film they may have forgotten..
5. I her first 3 days Tina Roth Eisenberg (one of my favorite lady crushes of ALL-TIME) surpassed her financial goal in kickstarter! DAMN STRAIGHT I want to support this! I’ve mentioned Creative Mornings videos a couple times on my blog already (here, here), because they really are so good (note: IF you’re interested in working in the creative industry). They also just have a great concept behind them: get the inspiring feeling of a conference more often! And for cheaper!  You can get to the Creative Mornings Website kickstarter page here.
6. This pinterest board called ‘SPACE’. Amazing uses of space and light, and some awesome installations, if I do say so myself.
7. This song. Bang Bang He Shot Me Down by Nancy Sinatra. It kills me..
8. The quote above was said by Seth Godin on The Great Discontent and was found viaSwissMiss.
For this quote I did not want to use any fancy fonts or any graphic design. I could not bear even to use color in the background.  It all just looked so wrong. I just wanted the quote to speak to the world and to any of my readers that may happen upon it.  For you all, Pick yourself.

Art Installation: Maya Hayuk barn piece

I have loved Maya Hayuk’s work for quite a while. Even though the geometric, neon-y, graphic shapes thing is kinda trendy right now, she has actually been doing it for quite a long time, AND she does it really, really well.  She choses ways to present her work on surfaces or in ways wherein the contrast is actually really beautiful and where it accentuates her piece.  I think that in the way she presents it, it is really not a trend at all.  Its feels so much more honest than so many of the other geometric artwork pieces I’ve seen, and her use of color is PHEnominal.


Images from: here // here

Also, having my blog called ‘Kaleidoscope Brain’ DUH of course I’m into her!  Maya Hayuk: if you ever want to make me a piece go right ahead.  I’m thinking I would love it.


Images: here // here // here


Images: here // here  // here // here // here

The first time I ever heard about her was from the Etsy Handmade Portrait video that featured her and her work, and I really recommend giving it a watch. All the videos in the Handmade Portrait videos are amazing, but this one is one of my favorites, and is one I have watched over and over.

ID: Cool Cubicles

So, (forgive me for mentioning it) back-to-school is looming!, and this will be my last back-to-school for my undergrad! (Therefore, in my mind, it will be my last back-to-school… ever!)  I am excited and stressing and nervous and cravin it.  The only thing is, I have a big exam coming up right before school, which effectively taints a lot of the good back-to-school stuff (e.g. it ruins ‘fresh bouquets of pencils’, getting to wear fall jackets for the first time, meeting up with friends you haven’t seen all summer!, settling into a new version of home once more, making and getting to eat soup, all things pumpkin-related, etc…)

Anyway, with studying on the brain, for the ID post this week, I thought I’d show you guys some desk enclosures, cool cubicles and study spaces.


Rewrite by Gam Fratesi here // Flatmate here // Secret ‘AIR by ObjetB Art here // OSTRICH pocket pillow for nap, 2011 by Kawamura Ganjavian here // “Woven”, function and private desk area by here

And two more, because I couldn’t leave them out..

Office Collar by Simone Brewster here // Green DESKSHELL by Kawamura Ganjavian here

Cheers!

Figure Sculpture

If you are trying to improve your drawing, one really great way to do so is to try your hand at figure drawing and figure sculpture.  I am doing both right now, and they are helping IMMENSELY!

A lot of people ask me what life drawing has to do with Industrial Design, and what I always say is: If you can draw the body, the most complex, dynamic thing ever, you can draw virtually anything.

In my life drawing class we learn different techniques of drawing and life drawing every class.  For example, we’ve done classes where we only draw by edges (contour), by volumes and masses, by scale and alignment, by gesture, by shadow and light, by 3-dimensionality, etc…  All of the ‘greats’ did figure drawing as well, and its really interesting to see their charcoal work and how their approaches were similar or different from their famous works.

Example 1: Georges Seurat

Seurat is very famous for his use of pointillism and  this painting, which you might recognize:
“A Sunday On La Grande Jatte”, 1884. here.

In these drawings he likely used soft charcoal on very rough paper. Although he doesn’t actually do pointillism here, his rough paper makes it appear as though he’s using a sort of pointillism.


Also, you can see how he uses light and shadow very effectively to create 3-dimensionality, but I would guess that he is not as concerned with realism or accuracy in his life drawings. This actually makes perfect sense with the rest of the image (the background, a prop) not being fixed in space, and being fairly undefined and unstable.. It is more of a question and a allegory to the background, than an actual drawing of the background itself, just like the details of the face are more general indications, with an emphasis of how the figure is formed out of the background.
Boy with hat here // Nude model here // Cat here // Crying woman reading here

-> Note: If you are lucky enough to find an entire book on the sketches or drawings of such-and-such artist, they are usually going to better than anything you find on the internet.  If you need some inspiration or guidance and don’t have anyone to ask, refer to these books in a library or in the library of a nearby art school… It really helps you improve when you know you have a long way to go to get to their level.

Example 2: Auguste Rodin


“The Thinker”, found here.

Rodin is most famous for his figure sculpture work, including the very famous “The Thinker”, but here we can see his relation to figure drawing.

As opposed to Seurat, Rodin was much more focused on edges and contour.  Almost all of his figure drawings are based on a thin wire-like edge around his figures, with cross-hatching shading applied on top.  This gives a clearer, more detailed image, but a more 2-dimensional effect.
Man curled on floor here // Minerva with watercolors here // woman and man here // seated female life drawing here

Seriously, applying these different techniques will really help your drawings.  Try them out on people on the bus or at a coffee shop, and you’ll see how much they actually help you see differently.

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